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OW TO READ BOOKS AND BECOME SMARTER IN LESS THAN TWO HOURS

[TF LATFY] HOW TO READ BOOKS AND BECOME SMARTER IN LESS THAN TWO HOURS

(If you’re not into books, then you can switch back to whatever WhatsApp hoax you’ve been reading just now)

How many books can you read in one day?

I just got back from sending my daughter to her uni. The time it took from Ampang to Shah Alam and back was (give or take) an hour and a half (good traffic today).

Within that time I actually finished reading three books:
1. The House that Jack Ma Built (the story of how Jack Ma built the highly successful Alibaba.com online bussiness. I’ve been wanting to read this book the moment I saw it on the bookstores’ shelves, but too judgmental to read anything if not written by Dr Seuss)
2. The Story of Sushi by Trevor Carson (we just got back from Japan and my kids love sushi. This book gives you great insights on the origins and eating sushi best practices)
3. The Machine That Changed the World (the story of Toyota. So much have been written about the Toyota ways of running a mass-production car manufacturing that reading and knowing about it is not a novelty anymore, but a 15-minute refresher is nothing much to lose).

Well, to be exact, it wasn’t me reading. Someone else read the books for me. And not the whole book, but rather – the gist of it. And it wasn’t my daughter neither.

The books were read by some voiceover talents who summarised the contents into nice 15-minutes chunks audio that you can listen while driving. They also come in written form: short insights broken into 7 or 8 pages should you wish to read or refer to.

What it gives are the highlights, liken to the trunk of a tree, with branches being mentioned. And to know better about the branches, you’ll have to read the books yourself. But the Blinks (as they call it) are good starting points, as it gives you well-written summaries. It also mentions memorable stories or anecdotes, of which if relayed to someone else, will make you to look like you actually read the whole book yourself (sounds good eh?).

Some books are meant to be read, especially those that were written by authors whose writings are enlightingly joyful to be read.

Then there are some books that you really wanted to read but have no time. Back in the old days where people still see each other to gossip (instead of using smartphones), the solution to this is to belong in reading circles, where you have something like monthly or weekly get together and everyone discusses the books they we assigned to read during the previous meeting. You then get summarised second-hand knowledge from the person who read a particular book without having to spend the whole week (or month) reading it. It benefits the person reading as well since it makes their mind actively engaged in the material as they have to understand the book well in order not to disappoint the circle by giving lousy reviews.

But if this sounds too nerdy to you, then there’s Blinkist.

The best part is this service (it has free and paid memberships) there’re key takeaways at the end of each book, things that you can straight away use in the practical sense.

Well, that’s what readings are for right?

I wonder what’s the key takeaways of THIS article then.

Happy Reading!

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